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Administration

Trustee Nomination Form
Public Hearing Notice
Proposed Rules
 
Board of Trustees

The South Dakota State Historical Society is governed by a twelve-member board of trustees. Six members are appointed by the Governor of the State of South Dakota, and six members are elected by the Society membership. The board also serves as the state review board for historic preservation purposes and includes an archaeologist, an architect, an architectural historian, an archivist, and a historian.

John D. Fowler, Elk Point
Jennifer Winter, Pierre
Tom Hurlbert, Sioux Falls
Lura Roti, Sioux Falls
David Patterson, Brookings
Billie Kingfisher Jr., Vermillion
Peggy Sanders, Oral
Michelle L. Dennis, Rapid City
Brad Tennant, President, Aberdeen
Brian Sandvig, Milbank
Marshall Damgaard, Sioux Falls
David A. Wolff, Spearfish
Dr. Ben Jones (Director), Sioux Falls

Meeting Schedule

Meeting information about the Board of Trustees can now be found at https://boardsandcommissions.sd.gov/Meetings.aspx?BoardID=50

 

Staff
Listed in alphabetical order
 

Liz Almlie
Historic Preservation
(605)773-6056

Renee Boen
Archaeology
(605)394-1938

Monica Bugbee
Archaeology
(605)209-1478

Logan Bullard
Archaeology
(605)381-2928

Matt Busch
Archaeology
(605)209-0368

Jenna Carlson Dietmeier
Historic Preservation
(605)773-8370

Sara Casper
State Archives
(605)773-3780

Erika Cerveny
Archaeology
(605)394-1936

Corey Christianson
Museum
(605)773-8241

Holly Crosby
SD Historical Society Foundation
(605)773-6346

Kevin DeVries
State Archives
(605)773-3804

Sarah Dozier
Research and Publishing
(605)773-6009

Cody Ewert
Research and Publishing
(605) 773-2904

Catherine Forsch
SD Historical Society Foundation
(605)773-6003

David Grabitske
Museum
(605)773-3798

Lynn Griffin
Archaeology
(605)394-6696

Virginia M. Hanson
State Archives
(605)773-3616

Nicole Hosette
State Archives
(605)773-4369

Kim Hunt
Administration
(605)773-6001

Brian Huot
Archaeology
(605)394-1902

Dr. Benjamin F. Jones
Director
(605)773-3458

Sarah Kirchman
State Archives
(605)773-2089

Kevin Larsen
Administration
(605)773-6000

Katie Lamie
Archaeology
(605)394-1804

Dustin Lloyd
Archaeology
(605)391-2928

Steve Mayer
State Archives
(605)773-3277

Dedra McDonald Birzer
Research and Publishing
(605)773-4371

Heather Mulliner
Historic Preservation
(605)773-6005

Chris Nelson
Historic Preservation
(605)773-3103

Lisa Nesselbeck
Archaeology
(605)209-2581

Amber Odom
Archaeology
(605)394-1936

Holly Phillips
Archaeology
(605)394-6123

Michelle Prichard
Archaeology
(605)394-1936

Cherri Reed
State Archives
(605)773-2089

Matthew Reitzel
State Archives
(605)773-3615

Ronette Rumpca
Museum
(605)773-6011

Katy Schmidt
Museum
(605)773-6013

Katie Shroyer
Historic Preservation
(605)773-2907

Kimberly Smith
State Archives
(605)773-4233

Chelle Somsen
State Archives
(605)773-5521

Ted Spencer
Historic Preservation
(605)773-6296

Cassie Vogt
Archaeology
(605)209-1443

Katie Wasley
Historic Preservation
(605)773-2907

Jane Watts
Archaeology
(605)394-1939

David Williams
Archaeology
(605)394-1942

Amy Woodruff
Archaeology
(605)381-6985

Vacant
Research and Publishing
(605)773-8161

Vacant
Research and Publishing
(605)773-6008

Vacant
SD Historical Society Foundation
(605)773-6006

Vacant
Historic Preservation
(605)773-6004

Logo


A masterpiece of Lakota sculpture, the Sioux Horse Effigy dance stick, ca. 1870, was probably carved to honor a wounded horse and is considered one of the greatest equine sculptures in the world. This singular piece of the museum's collection is incorporated into the Society's logo.

Carved out of wood, this 3-foot-long sculpture is enhanced by its real horsehair mane and tail. Leather reins and bridle exhibit care with which this sculpture was made. The horse is also riddled with holes, bullet wounds. Red paint, blood, seems to seep from these wounds, suggesting that it died in battle. Blood also runs from the horse's mouth in the form of red horsehair. Its ears are backward slanting, showing fear and pain. The horse's elongated body and forward leaping motion suggest a leap from life to death.

In 2014-15, the Horse Effigy traveled to museums in Paris, New York City and Kansas City with the exhibit entitled The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky.

 


 


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